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Inhibitory Control in Bilinguals and Musicians: Event Related Potential (ERP) Evidence for Experience-Specific Effects.

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Inhibitory Control in Bilinguals and Musicians: Event Related Potential (ERP) Evidence for Experience-Specific Effects.

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dc.contributor.author Moreno, Sylvain pl
dc.contributor.author Wodniecka-Chlipalska, Zofia [SAP11018429] pl
dc.contributor.author Tays, William pl
dc.contributor.author Alain, Claude pl
dc.contributor.author Bialystok, Ellen pl
dc.date.accessioned 2015-07-20T10:50:18Z
dc.date.available 2015-07-20T10:50:18Z
dc.date.issued 2014 pl
dc.identifier.uri http://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/13410
dc.language eng pl
dc.rights Udzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/pl/legalcode *
dc.title Inhibitory Control in Bilinguals and Musicians: Event Related Potential (ERP) Evidence for Experience-Specific Effects. pl
dc.type JournalArticle pl
dc.abstract.en Bilinguals and musicians exhibit behavioral advantages on tasks with high demands on executive functioning, particularly inhibitory control, but the brain mechanisms supporting these differences are unclear. Of key interest is whether these forms of experience influence cognition through similar or distinct information processing mechanisms. Here, we recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) in three groups – bilinguals, musicians, and controls – who completed a visual go-nogo task that involved the withholding of key presses to rare targets. Participants in each group achieved similar accuracy rates and responses times but the analysis of cortical responses revealed significant differences in ERP waveforms. Success in withholding a prepotent response was associated with enhanced stimulus-locked N2 and P3 wave amplitude relative to go trials. For nogo trials, there were altered timing-specific ERP differences and graded amplitude differences observed in the neural responses across groups. Specifically, musicians showed an enhanced early P2 response accompanied by reduced N2 amplitude whereas bilinguals showed increased N2 amplitude coupled with an increased late positivity wave relative to controls. These findings demonstrate that bilingualism and music training have differential effects on the brain networks supporting executive control over behavior pl
dc.description.volume 9 pl
dc.description.number 4 pl
dc.identifier.doi 10.1371/journal.pone.0094169 pl
dc.identifier.eissn 1932-6203 pl
dc.title.journal PLoS ONE pl
dc.language.container eng pl
dc.affiliation Wydział Filozoficzny : Instytut Psychologii pl
dc.subtype Article pl
dc.identifier.articleid e94169 pl
dc.rights.original CC-BY; otwarte czasopismo; ostateczna wersja wydawcy; w momencie opublikowania; 0; pl
dc.identifier.project ROD UJ / P pl
.pointsMNiSW [2014 A]: 40


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Udzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Udzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa