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Bacterial symbionts of the leafhopper "Evacanthus interruptus" (Linnaeus, 1758) (Insecta, Hemiptera, Cicadellidae : Evacanthinae)

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Bacterial symbionts of the leafhopper "Evacanthus interruptus" (Linnaeus, 1758) (Insecta, Hemiptera, Cicadellidae : Evacanthinae)

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dc.contributor.author Szklarzewicz, Teresa [SAP11011788] pl
dc.contributor.author Grzywacz, Beata pl
dc.contributor.author Szwedo, Jacek pl
dc.contributor.author Michalik, Anna [SAP12019714] pl
dc.date.accessioned 2016-07-07T12:36:04Z
dc.date.available 2016-07-07T12:36:04Z
dc.date.issued 2016 pl
dc.identifier.issn 0033-183X pl
dc.identifier.uri http://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/28796
dc.language eng pl
dc.rights Udzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa *
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/pl/legalcode *
dc.title Bacterial symbionts of the leafhopper "Evacanthus interruptus" (Linnaeus, 1758) (Insecta, Hemiptera, Cicadellidae : Evacanthinae) pl
dc.type JournalArticle pl
dc.description.physical 379-391 pl
dc.description.additional Bibliogr. s. 389-391 pl
dc.abstract.en Plant sap-feeding hemipterans harbor obligate symbiotic microorganisms which are responsible for the synthesis of amino acids missing in their diet. In this study, we characterized the obligate symbionts hosted in the body of the xylem-feeding leafhopper Evacanthus interruptus (Cicadellidae: Evacanthinae: Evacanthini) by means of histological, ultrastructural and molecular methods. We observed that E. interruptus is associated with two types of symbiotic microorganisms: bacterium ‘Candidatus Sulcia muelleri’ (Bacteroidetes) and betaproteobacterium that is closely related to symbionts which reside in two other Cicadellidae representatives: Pagaronia tredecimpunctata (Evacanthinae: Pagaronini) and Hylaius oregonensis (Bathysmatophorinae: Bathysmatophorini). Both symbionts are harbored in their own bacteriocytes which are localized between the body wall and ovaries. In E. interruptus, both Sulcia and betaproteobacterial symbionts are transovarially transmitted from one generation to the next. In the mature female, symbionts leave the bacteriocytes and gather around the posterior pole of the terminal oocytes. Then, they gradually pass through the cytoplasm of follicular cells surrounding the posterior pole of the oocyte and enter the space between them and the oocyte. The bacteria accumulate in the deep depression of the oolemma and form a characteristic ‘symbiont ball’. In the light of the results obtained, the phylogenetic relationships within modern Cicadomorpha and some Cicadellidae subfamilies are discussed. pl
dc.subject.en symbiotic microorganisms pl
dc.subject.en Sulcia pl
dc.subject.en bacteriocytes pl
dc.subject.en transovarial transmission of symbionts pl
dc.subject.en Cicadellidae pl
dc.description.volume 253 pl
dc.description.number 2 pl
dc.identifier.doi 10.1007/s00709-015-0817-2 pl
dc.identifier.eissn 1615-6102 pl
dc.title.journal Protoplasma pl
dc.language.container eng pl
dc.affiliation Wydział Biologii i Nauk o Ziemi : Instytut Zoologii pl
dc.subtype Article pl
dc.rights.original CC-BY; inne; ostateczna wersja wydawcy; w momencie opublikowania; 0; pl
dc.identifier.project ROD UJ / P pl
.pointsMNiSW [2016 A]: 30


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Udzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Udzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa