Scaling of erythrocyte shape and nucleus size among squamate reptiles : reanalysis points to constrained, proportional rather than adaptive changes

2023
journal article
article
dc.abstract.enSmall erythrocytes might be beneficial for blood rheology, as they contribute less to blood viscosity than large erythrocytes. We predicted that rheological disadvantages of larger erythrocytes could be alleviated by relatively smaller nucleus size in larger cells allowing higher flexibility and by more elongated shape. Across squamate reptiles, we found that species with larger erythrocytes tend to have smaller ratio of nucleus size to cell size (N : C ratio), but that larger erythrocytes tend to be rounder, not more elongated. Nevertheless, we document that in fact nucleus area changes with erythrocyte area more or less linearly, which is also true for the relationship between cell length and cell width. These linear relationships suggest that nucleus size and cell size, and cell width and cell length, might be constrained to largely proportional mutual changes. The shifts in widely used N : C ratio and elongation ratio (cell length/cell width) with cell size might be misleading, as they do not reflect adaptive or maladaptive changes of erythrocytes, but rather mathematically trivial scaling of the ratios of two variables with a linear relationship with non-zero intercepts. We warn that ratio scaling without analyses of underlying patterns of evolutionary changes can lead to misinterpretation of evolutionary processes.
dc.affiliationWydział Biologii : Instytut Zoologii i Badań Biomedycznych
dc.contributor.authorBury, Stanisław - 175272
dc.contributor.authorKratochvíl, Lukáš
dc.contributor.authorStarostová, Zuzana
dc.date.accession2023
dc.date.accessioned2024-05-22T06:50:01Z
dc.date.available2024-05-22T06:50:01Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.date.openaccess0
dc.description.accesstimew momencie opublikowania
dc.description.number4
dc.description.versionostateczna wersja wydawcy
dc.description.volume10
dc.identifier.articleid221513
dc.identifier.doi10.1098/rsos.221513
dc.identifier.eissn2054-5703
dc.identifier.projectUMO-2019/32/T/NZ8/00410
dc.identifier.urihttps://ruj.uj.edu.pl/handle/item/341466
dc.languageeng
dc.language.containereng
dc.rightsUdzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa
dc.rights.licenceCC-BY
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode.pl
dc.share.typeotwarte czasopismo
dc.subject.encell size
dc.subject.encell shape
dc.subject.enN : C ratio
dc.subject.enerythrocytes
dc.subject.enscaling
dc.subject.enreptiles
dc.subtypeArticle
dc.titleScaling of erythrocyte shape and nucleus size among squamate reptiles : reanalysis points to constrained, proportional rather than adaptive changes
dc.title.journalRoyal Society Open Science
dc.typeJournalArticle
dspace.entity.typePublicationen
dc.abstract.en
Small erythrocytes might be beneficial for blood rheology, as they contribute less to blood viscosity than large erythrocytes. We predicted that rheological disadvantages of larger erythrocytes could be alleviated by relatively smaller nucleus size in larger cells allowing higher flexibility and by more elongated shape. Across squamate reptiles, we found that species with larger erythrocytes tend to have smaller ratio of nucleus size to cell size (N : C ratio), but that larger erythrocytes tend to be rounder, not more elongated. Nevertheless, we document that in fact nucleus area changes with erythrocyte area more or less linearly, which is also true for the relationship between cell length and cell width. These linear relationships suggest that nucleus size and cell size, and cell width and cell length, might be constrained to largely proportional mutual changes. The shifts in widely used N : C ratio and elongation ratio (cell length/cell width) with cell size might be misleading, as they do not reflect adaptive or maladaptive changes of erythrocytes, but rather mathematically trivial scaling of the ratios of two variables with a linear relationship with non-zero intercepts. We warn that ratio scaling without analyses of underlying patterns of evolutionary changes can lead to misinterpretation of evolutionary processes.
dc.affiliation
Wydział Biologii : Instytut Zoologii i Badań Biomedycznych
dc.contributor.author
Bury, Stanisław - 175272
dc.contributor.author
Kratochvíl, Lukáš
dc.contributor.author
Starostová, Zuzana
dc.date.accession
2023
dc.date.accessioned
2024-05-22T06:50:01Z
dc.date.available
2024-05-22T06:50:01Z
dc.date.issued
2023
dc.date.openaccess
0
dc.description.accesstime
w momencie opublikowania
dc.description.number
4
dc.description.version
ostateczna wersja wydawcy
dc.description.volume
10
dc.identifier.articleid
221513
dc.identifier.doi
10.1098/rsos.221513
dc.identifier.eissn
2054-5703
dc.identifier.project
UMO-2019/32/T/NZ8/00410
dc.identifier.uri
https://ruj.uj.edu.pl/handle/item/341466
dc.language
eng
dc.language.container
eng
dc.rights
Udzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa
dc.rights.licence
CC-BY
dc.rights.uri
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode.pl
dc.share.type
otwarte czasopismo
dc.subject.en
cell size
dc.subject.en
cell shape
dc.subject.en
N : C ratio
dc.subject.en
erythrocytes
dc.subject.en
scaling
dc.subject.en
reptiles
dc.subtype
Article
dc.title
Scaling of erythrocyte shape and nucleus size among squamate reptiles : reanalysis points to constrained, proportional rather than adaptive changes
dc.title.journal
Royal Society Open Science
dc.type
JournalArticle
dspace.entity.typeen
Publication

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