Miłosz and Conrad in the "Treatise in Morality"

2012
journal article
article
cris.lastimport.wos2024-04-10T02:53:07Z
dc.abstract.enIt would appear that Czesław Miłosz’s Treatise on Morality - one of whose aims was to “stave off despair” - was largely inspired by the writings of Joseph Conrad. That Miłosz had no wish to draw his readers’ attention to this is perfectly understandable, given Conrad’s particularly low standing in the eyes of communist State censors. This long poem, which extols human freedom and pours scorn on socialist realism (together with its ideological premises), is one of Miłosz’s best known works in his native Poland, where it was published in 1948. The Treatise on Morality may well have been inspired by three of Conrad’s essays that were banned in communist Poland: Autocracy and War, A Note on the Polish Problem and The Crime of Partition. Conrad’s writings would appear to have helped Miłosz to diagnose Poland’s political predicament from a historical perspective and to look for a way out of it without losing all hope. An analysis of the Treatise on Morality shows that only by reconstructing the Conradian atmosphere and context - alluded to in the text - can we fully grasp all the levels of the poet’s irony, which culminates in a final “punchline” alluding to Heart of Darkness. Apart from suggestive allusions to the brutal colonization of the Congo, the fate of post-war Poland is also seen through the optic of those of Conrad’s novels that deal with the subject of depraved revolutionaries: Nostromo, The Secret Agent and Under Western Eyes. Conrad’s ideas for ways to fight against bad fortune and despair are suggested not only by his stories Youth and Typhoon - and by his novels The Nigger of the “Narcissus” and Lord Jim - but also and above all by his volume of memoirs entitled A Personal Record, in which he relates his yearning for freedom as the young, tragic victim of a foreign empire. In an article entitled Joseph Conrad in Polish Eyes and published in 1957 — on the hundredth anniversary of Conrad’s birth - Miłosz writes that, through his writings, Conrad fulfilled the hopes of his father (who gave him the name “Konrad”) and that although “the son did not want to assume a burden that had crushed his father, he had nevertheless become the defender of freedom against the blights of autocracy.”pl
dc.affiliationWydział Polonistyki : Katedra Teorii Literaturypl
dc.contributor.authorDudek, Jolanta - 127799 pl
dc.date.accession2016-06-07pl
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-07T17:38:24Z
dc.date.available2016-06-07T17:38:24Z
dc.date.issued2012pl
dc.date.openaccess0
dc.description.accesstimew momencie opublikowania
dc.description.additionalBibliogr.pl
dc.description.physical163-171pl
dc.description.publication2,66pl
dc.description.versionostateczna wersja wydawcy
dc.description.volume7pl
dc.identifier.doi10.4467/20843941YC.12.007.0696pl
dc.identifier.eissn2084-3941pl
dc.identifier.issn1899-3028pl
dc.identifier.projectROD UJ / Ppl
dc.identifier.urihttp://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/27628
dc.identifier.weblinkhttp://www.ejournals.eu/Yearbook-of-Conrad-Studies/2012/Issue-VII/pl
dc.languageengpl
dc.language.containerengpl
dc.rightsDozwolony użytek utworów chronionych*
dc.rights.licenceOTHER
dc.rights.urihttp://ruj.uj.edu.pl/4dspace/License/copyright/licencja_copyright.pdf*
dc.share.typeotwarte czasopismo
dc.subject.ena note on the Polish problempl
dc.subject.ena personal recordpl
dc.subject.enautocracy and warpl
dc.subject.encolonialismpl
dc.subject.encommunismpl
dc.subject.enCongopl
dc.subject.enCzesław Miłoszpl
dc.subject.enfreedompl
dc.subject.enHeart of Darknesspl
dc.subject.enJoseph Conradpl
dc.subject.ensolidaritypl
dc.subject.entreatise on moralitypl
dc.subject.enTyphoonpl
dc.subtypeArticlepl
dc.titleMiłosz and Conrad in the "Treatise in Morality"pl
dc.title.journalYearbook of Conrad Studies (Poland)pl
dc.typeJournalArticlepl
dspace.entity.typePublication
cris.lastimport.wos
2024-04-10T02:53:07Z
dc.abstract.enpl
It would appear that Czesław Miłosz’s Treatise on Morality - one of whose aims was to “stave off despair” - was largely inspired by the writings of Joseph Conrad. That Miłosz had no wish to draw his readers’ attention to this is perfectly understandable, given Conrad’s particularly low standing in the eyes of communist State censors. This long poem, which extols human freedom and pours scorn on socialist realism (together with its ideological premises), is one of Miłosz’s best known works in his native Poland, where it was published in 1948. The Treatise on Morality may well have been inspired by three of Conrad’s essays that were banned in communist Poland: Autocracy and War, A Note on the Polish Problem and The Crime of Partition. Conrad’s writings would appear to have helped Miłosz to diagnose Poland’s political predicament from a historical perspective and to look for a way out of it without losing all hope. An analysis of the Treatise on Morality shows that only by reconstructing the Conradian atmosphere and context - alluded to in the text - can we fully grasp all the levels of the poet’s irony, which culminates in a final “punchline” alluding to Heart of Darkness. Apart from suggestive allusions to the brutal colonization of the Congo, the fate of post-war Poland is also seen through the optic of those of Conrad’s novels that deal with the subject of depraved revolutionaries: Nostromo, The Secret Agent and Under Western Eyes. Conrad’s ideas for ways to fight against bad fortune and despair are suggested not only by his stories Youth and Typhoon - and by his novels The Nigger of the “Narcissus” and Lord Jim - but also and above all by his volume of memoirs entitled A Personal Record, in which he relates his yearning for freedom as the young, tragic victim of a foreign empire. In an article entitled Joseph Conrad in Polish Eyes and published in 1957 — on the hundredth anniversary of Conrad’s birth - Miłosz writes that, through his writings, Conrad fulfilled the hopes of his father (who gave him the name “Konrad”) and that although “the son did not want to assume a burden that had crushed his father, he had nevertheless become the defender of freedom against the blights of autocracy.”
dc.affiliationpl
Wydział Polonistyki : Katedra Teorii Literatury
dc.contributor.authorpl
Dudek, Jolanta - 127799
dc.date.accessionpl
2016-06-07
dc.date.accessioned
2016-06-07T17:38:24Z
dc.date.available
2016-06-07T17:38:24Z
dc.date.issuedpl
2012
dc.date.openaccess
0
dc.description.accesstime
w momencie opublikowania
dc.description.additionalpl
Bibliogr.
dc.description.physicalpl
163-171
dc.description.publicationpl
2,66
dc.description.version
ostateczna wersja wydawcy
dc.description.volumepl
7
dc.identifier.doipl
10.4467/20843941YC.12.007.0696
dc.identifier.eissnpl
2084-3941
dc.identifier.issnpl
1899-3028
dc.identifier.projectpl
ROD UJ / P
dc.identifier.uri
http://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/27628
dc.identifier.weblinkpl
http://www.ejournals.eu/Yearbook-of-Conrad-Studies/2012/Issue-VII/
dc.languagepl
eng
dc.language.containerpl
eng
dc.rights*
Dozwolony użytek utworów chronionych
dc.rights.licence
OTHER
dc.rights.uri*
http://ruj.uj.edu.pl/4dspace/License/copyright/licencja_copyright.pdf
dc.share.type
otwarte czasopismo
dc.subject.enpl
a note on the Polish problem
dc.subject.enpl
a personal record
dc.subject.enpl
autocracy and war
dc.subject.enpl
colonialism
dc.subject.enpl
communism
dc.subject.enpl
Congo
dc.subject.enpl
Czesław Miłosz
dc.subject.enpl
freedom
dc.subject.enpl
Heart of Darkness
dc.subject.enpl
Joseph Conrad
dc.subject.enpl
solidarity
dc.subject.enpl
treatise on morality
dc.subject.enpl
Typhoon
dc.subtypepl
Article
dc.titlepl
Miłosz and Conrad in the "Treatise in Morality"
dc.title.journalpl
Yearbook of Conrad Studies (Poland)
dc.typepl
JournalArticle
dspace.entity.type
Publication

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