Diurnal variations of resting-state fMRI data : a graph-based analysis

2022
journal article
article
11
cris.lastimport.wos2024-04-09T18:02:26Z
dc.abstract.enCircadian rhythms (lasting approximately 24 h) control and entrain various physiological processes, ranging from neural activity and hormone secretion to sleep cycles and eating habits. Several studies have shown that time of day (TOD) is associated with human cognition and brain functions. In this study, utilizing a chronotype-based paradigm, we applied a graph theory approach on resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) data to compare whole-brain functional network topology between morning and evening sessions and between morning-type (MT) and evening-type (ET) participants. Sixty-two individuals (31 MT and 31 ET) underwent two fMRI sessions, approximately 1 hour (morning) and 10 h (evening) after their wake-up time, according to their declared habitual sleep-wake pattern on a regular working day. In the global analysis, the findings revealed the effect of TOD on functional connectivity (FC) patterns, including increased small-worldness, assortativity, and synchronization across the day. However, we identified no significant differences based on chronotype categories. The study of the modular structure of the brain at mesoscale showed that functional networks tended to be more integrated with one another in the evening session than in the morning session. Local/regional changes were affected by both factors (i.e., TOD and chronotype), mostly in areas associated with somatomotor, attention, frontoparietal, and default networks. Furthermore, connectivity and hub analyses revealed that the somatomotor, ventral attention, and visual networks covered the most highly connected areas in the morning and evening sessions: the latter two were more active in the morning sessions, and the first was identified as being more active in the evening. Finally, we performed a correlation analysis to determine whether global and nodal measures were associated with subjective assessments across participants. Collectively, these findings contribute to an increased understanding of diurnal fluctuations in resting brain activity and highlight the role of TOD in future studies on brain function and the design of fMRI experiments.pl
dc.affiliationWydział Zarządzania i Komunikacji Społecznej : Instytut Psychologii Stosowanejpl
dc.affiliationSzkoła Doktorska Nauk Społecznychpl
dc.contributor.authorFarahani, Farzad V.pl
dc.contributor.authorKarwowski, Waldemarpl
dc.contributor.authorD'Esposito, Markpl
dc.contributor.authorBetzel, Richard F.pl
dc.contributor.authorDouglas, Pamela K.pl
dc.contributor.authorSobczak, Anna - 258112 pl
dc.contributor.authorBohaterewicz, Bartosz - 394292 pl
dc.contributor.authorMarek, Tadeusz - 102084 pl
dc.contributor.authorFąfrowicz, Magdalena - 127888 pl
dc.date.accession2023-02-07pl
dc.date.accessioned2023-02-17T13:34:55Z
dc.date.available2023-02-17T13:34:55Z
dc.date.issued2022pl
dc.date.openaccess0
dc.description.accesstimew momencie opublikowania
dc.description.additionalBibliogr. s. 22-25pl
dc.description.publication3,3pl
dc.description.versionostateczna wersja wydawcy
dc.description.volume256pl
dc.identifier.articleid119246pl
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.neuroimage.2022.119246pl
dc.identifier.eissn1095-9572pl
dc.identifier.issn1053-8119pl
dc.identifier.urihttps://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/307951
dc.identifier.weblinkhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053811922003706pl
dc.languageengpl
dc.language.containerengpl
dc.rightsUdzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa*
dc.rights.licenceCC-BY
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode.pl*
dc.share.typeotwarte czasopismo
dc.subject.enfunctional connectivitypl
dc.subject.enresting-state fMRIpl
dc.subject.engraph theorypl
dc.subject.ennetwork analysispl
dc.subject.encircadian rhythmpl
dc.subject.enchronotypepl
dc.subject.enbrain networkspl
dc.subtypeArticlepl
dc.titleDiurnal variations of resting-state fMRI data : a graph-based analysispl
dc.title.journalNeuroImagepl
dc.typeJournalArticlepl
dspace.entity.typePublication
cris.lastimport.wos
2024-04-09T18:02:26Z
dc.abstract.enpl
Circadian rhythms (lasting approximately 24 h) control and entrain various physiological processes, ranging from neural activity and hormone secretion to sleep cycles and eating habits. Several studies have shown that time of day (TOD) is associated with human cognition and brain functions. In this study, utilizing a chronotype-based paradigm, we applied a graph theory approach on resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) data to compare whole-brain functional network topology between morning and evening sessions and between morning-type (MT) and evening-type (ET) participants. Sixty-two individuals (31 MT and 31 ET) underwent two fMRI sessions, approximately 1 hour (morning) and 10 h (evening) after their wake-up time, according to their declared habitual sleep-wake pattern on a regular working day. In the global analysis, the findings revealed the effect of TOD on functional connectivity (FC) patterns, including increased small-worldness, assortativity, and synchronization across the day. However, we identified no significant differences based on chronotype categories. The study of the modular structure of the brain at mesoscale showed that functional networks tended to be more integrated with one another in the evening session than in the morning session. Local/regional changes were affected by both factors (i.e., TOD and chronotype), mostly in areas associated with somatomotor, attention, frontoparietal, and default networks. Furthermore, connectivity and hub analyses revealed that the somatomotor, ventral attention, and visual networks covered the most highly connected areas in the morning and evening sessions: the latter two were more active in the morning sessions, and the first was identified as being more active in the evening. Finally, we performed a correlation analysis to determine whether global and nodal measures were associated with subjective assessments across participants. Collectively, these findings contribute to an increased understanding of diurnal fluctuations in resting brain activity and highlight the role of TOD in future studies on brain function and the design of fMRI experiments.
dc.affiliationpl
Wydział Zarządzania i Komunikacji Społecznej : Instytut Psychologii Stosowanej
dc.affiliationpl
Szkoła Doktorska Nauk Społecznych
dc.contributor.authorpl
Farahani, Farzad V.
dc.contributor.authorpl
Karwowski, Waldemar
dc.contributor.authorpl
D'Esposito, Mark
dc.contributor.authorpl
Betzel, Richard F.
dc.contributor.authorpl
Douglas, Pamela K.
dc.contributor.authorpl
Sobczak, Anna - 258112
dc.contributor.authorpl
Bohaterewicz, Bartosz - 394292
dc.contributor.authorpl
Marek, Tadeusz - 102084
dc.contributor.authorpl
Fąfrowicz, Magdalena - 127888
dc.date.accessionpl
2023-02-07
dc.date.accessioned
2023-02-17T13:34:55Z
dc.date.available
2023-02-17T13:34:55Z
dc.date.issuedpl
2022
dc.date.openaccess
0
dc.description.accesstime
w momencie opublikowania
dc.description.additionalpl
Bibliogr. s. 22-25
dc.description.publicationpl
3,3
dc.description.version
ostateczna wersja wydawcy
dc.description.volumepl
256
dc.identifier.articleidpl
119246
dc.identifier.doipl
10.1016/j.neuroimage.2022.119246
dc.identifier.eissnpl
1095-9572
dc.identifier.issnpl
1053-8119
dc.identifier.uri
https://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/307951
dc.identifier.weblinkpl
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1053811922003706
dc.languagepl
eng
dc.language.containerpl
eng
dc.rights*
Udzielam licencji. Uznanie autorstwa 4.0 Międzynarodowa
dc.rights.licence
CC-BY
dc.rights.uri*
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode.pl
dc.share.type
otwarte czasopismo
dc.subject.enpl
functional connectivity
dc.subject.enpl
resting-state fMRI
dc.subject.enpl
graph theory
dc.subject.enpl
network analysis
dc.subject.enpl
circadian rhythm
dc.subject.enpl
chronotype
dc.subject.enpl
brain networks
dc.subtypepl
Article
dc.titlepl
Diurnal variations of resting-state fMRI data : a graph-based analysis
dc.title.journalpl
NeuroImage
dc.typepl
JournalArticle
dspace.entity.type
Publication

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