Czy Erazm z Rotterdamu był Niemcem? : o tożsamości zbiorowej humanistów północnych

2016
book section
article
dc.abstract.enThis article aims to describe the development of spatial, religious and political self-consciousness as the key attribute of Northern collective entities raised in the first part of the sixteenth century. Desiderius Erasmus was chosen here as a central figure, since his longtime struggles with establishing his spatial and national status provide both a point of departure, often a trouble spot, as well as a transferable blueprint of how the other Northern intellectuals were establishing their own place within the particular communities. The article consists of introduction where the meaning of an early-modern Germanness is explained, and four chapters that discuss the different facets of a Northern identity in the sixteenth century. First chapter, The Gallo-Germanic Borderland, is focused on the topographical and geographical ambiguities, being an obstacle for establishing one’s own spatial and national status. For according to ancient and early-modern geography, Erasmus’ native Holland had inclined towards both Gaul and Germany. Consequently both collectivities, albeit mostly Germans, were keen to consider Erasmus as their fellow-countryman, or even, when disappointed by his national indecisiveness, a Gallo-German. In the following chapter, entitled Batavian Issue, the question of Batavian origins of Hollanders is taken into consideration – whether county of Holland was a legitimate heir to ancient Batavia, and whether its inhabitants can justly call themselves Batavi. In neither case was Erasmus able to give a clear answer. Third chapter, Erasmus as Batavian Man and Orator, discusses encounters between Erasmus and Diego Stunica and later with Erasmus’ Italian and French adversaries in the debate over the imitation of Cicero. Erasmus was searching through them for an uniquely Northern and thus appropriate, or even valuable form of religious life and language, called philosophia Christi and dictio Batava respectively. In both cases it was a matter of religious, cultural and political revaluation of Northern barbarity, Batavian in particular, deliberately juxtaposed by Erasmus with the Mediterranean model of culture, inappropriate to homo Batavus. In the last chapter, Romana lingua, Lutheranism, and Linguistic Criterion of Germanness, the author indicates understanding of a language as a means of distinguishing national features, and co-establishing self-conscious collective beings. Erasmus’ Latin, as a religiously and politically incriminated or at least dubious tongue, turned out to be insufficient, since it was only Luther’s German (Hochdeutsch) that was capable to overcome the Roman supreme religious and secular authority. The author shows that Latin ceased to be a socially indifferent tongue and as a lingua Romana stood for non-German instrument of domination over the genuine Germans. Closing remarks provide the answer to the question raised in the title of this article. By way of using the categories of collective beings (natio, genus) introduced and carefully described by Erasmus himself, the author argues that Erasmus was indeed a German, but merely by jurisdiction. While according to his birth and origins he was a Hollander. In brief, Erasmus was natione Germanus, genere Hollandus (i.e. Batavus). Despite being a German by jurisdiction, already in the early twenties Erasmus distanced himself from his Upper-German milieu (including former Erasmians). He had no understanding of anti-Roman Germanness advocated by Luther and his German followers who ultimately outlived the previously shared image of Erasmus as Germaniae decus.pl
dc.affiliationWydział Polonistyki : Katedra Historii Literatury Staropolskiejpl
dc.contributor.authorKoryl, Jakub - 147909 pl
dc.contributor.editorNiedźwiedź, Jakub - 130940 pl
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-07T18:47:59Z
dc.date.available2016-06-07T18:47:59Z
dc.date.issued2016pl
dc.date.openaccess48
dc.description.accesstimepo opublikowaniu
dc.description.additionalStreszcz. po ang. Strona wydawcy: https://www.wuj.plpl
dc.description.physical201-250pl
dc.description.publication3,3pl
dc.description.seriesTerminus. Bibliotheca Classica. Seria 2
dc.description.seriesnumbernr 6
dc.description.versionostateczna wersja wydawcy
dc.identifier.eisbn978-83-233-9486-0pl
dc.identifier.isbn978-83-233-4024-9pl
dc.identifier.projectROD UJ / Ppl
dc.identifier.urihttp://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/27642
dc.languagepolpl
dc.language.containerpolpl
dc.pubinfoKraków : Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiegopl
dc.rightsDozwolony użytek utworów chronionych*
dc.rights.licenceOTHER
dc.rights.urihttp://ruj.uj.edu.pl/4dspace/License/copyright/licencja_copyright.pdf*
dc.share.typeotwarte repozytorium
dc.subject.enErasmuspl
dc.subject.enLutherpl
dc.subject.encollective identitypl
dc.subject.engeographypl
dc.subject.enBatavismpl
dc.subject.enerasmianismpl
dc.subject.enGerman humanism and ntionalismpl
dc.subject.plErazm z Rotterdamupl
dc.subject.plMarcin Luterpl
dc.subject.pltożsamość zbiorowapl
dc.subject.plgeografiapl
dc.subject.plBatawizmpl
dc.subject.plerazmianizmpl
dc.subject.plhumanizm i nacjonalizm niemieckipl
dc.subtypeArticlepl
dc.titleCzy Erazm z Rotterdamu był Niemcem? : o tożsamości zbiorowej humanistów północnychpl
dc.title.alternativeWas Erasmus a German? : on the collective Identity of northern humanistspl
dc.title.containerLiteratura renesansowa w Polsce i Europie : studia dedykowane Profesorowi Andrzejowi Borowskiemupl
dc.typeBookSectionpl
dspace.entity.typePublication
dc.abstract.enpl
This article aims to describe the development of spatial, religious and political self-consciousness as the key attribute of Northern collective entities raised in the first part of the sixteenth century. Desiderius Erasmus was chosen here as a central figure, since his longtime struggles with establishing his spatial and national status provide both a point of departure, often a trouble spot, as well as a transferable blueprint of how the other Northern intellectuals were establishing their own place within the particular communities. The article consists of introduction where the meaning of an early-modern Germanness is explained, and four chapters that discuss the different facets of a Northern identity in the sixteenth century. First chapter, The Gallo-Germanic Borderland, is focused on the topographical and geographical ambiguities, being an obstacle for establishing one’s own spatial and national status. For according to ancient and early-modern geography, Erasmus’ native Holland had inclined towards both Gaul and Germany. Consequently both collectivities, albeit mostly Germans, were keen to consider Erasmus as their fellow-countryman, or even, when disappointed by his national indecisiveness, a Gallo-German. In the following chapter, entitled Batavian Issue, the question of Batavian origins of Hollanders is taken into consideration – whether county of Holland was a legitimate heir to ancient Batavia, and whether its inhabitants can justly call themselves Batavi. In neither case was Erasmus able to give a clear answer. Third chapter, Erasmus as Batavian Man and Orator, discusses encounters between Erasmus and Diego Stunica and later with Erasmus’ Italian and French adversaries in the debate over the imitation of Cicero. Erasmus was searching through them for an uniquely Northern and thus appropriate, or even valuable form of religious life and language, called philosophia Christi and dictio Batava respectively. In both cases it was a matter of religious, cultural and political revaluation of Northern barbarity, Batavian in particular, deliberately juxtaposed by Erasmus with the Mediterranean model of culture, inappropriate to homo Batavus. In the last chapter, Romana lingua, Lutheranism, and Linguistic Criterion of Germanness, the author indicates understanding of a language as a means of distinguishing national features, and co-establishing self-conscious collective beings. Erasmus’ Latin, as a religiously and politically incriminated or at least dubious tongue, turned out to be insufficient, since it was only Luther’s German (Hochdeutsch) that was capable to overcome the Roman supreme religious and secular authority. The author shows that Latin ceased to be a socially indifferent tongue and as a lingua Romana stood for non-German instrument of domination over the genuine Germans. Closing remarks provide the answer to the question raised in the title of this article. By way of using the categories of collective beings (natio, genus) introduced and carefully described by Erasmus himself, the author argues that Erasmus was indeed a German, but merely by jurisdiction. While according to his birth and origins he was a Hollander. In brief, Erasmus was natione Germanus, genere Hollandus (i.e. Batavus). Despite being a German by jurisdiction, already in the early twenties Erasmus distanced himself from his Upper-German milieu (including former Erasmians). He had no understanding of anti-Roman Germanness advocated by Luther and his German followers who ultimately outlived the previously shared image of Erasmus as Germaniae decus.
dc.affiliationpl
Wydział Polonistyki : Katedra Historii Literatury Staropolskiej
dc.contributor.authorpl
Koryl, Jakub - 147909
dc.contributor.editorpl
Niedźwiedź, Jakub - 130940
dc.date.accessioned
2016-06-07T18:47:59Z
dc.date.available
2016-06-07T18:47:59Z
dc.date.issuedpl
2016
dc.date.openaccess
48
dc.description.accesstime
po opublikowaniu
dc.description.additionalpl
Streszcz. po ang. Strona wydawcy: https://www.wuj.pl
dc.description.physicalpl
201-250
dc.description.publicationpl
3,3
dc.description.series
Terminus. Bibliotheca Classica. Seria 2
dc.description.seriesnumber
nr 6
dc.description.version
ostateczna wersja wydawcy
dc.identifier.eisbnpl
978-83-233-9486-0
dc.identifier.isbnpl
978-83-233-4024-9
dc.identifier.projectpl
ROD UJ / P
dc.identifier.uri
http://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/27642
dc.languagepl
pol
dc.language.containerpl
pol
dc.pubinfopl
Kraków : Wydawnictwo Uniwersytetu Jagiellońskiego
dc.rights*
Dozwolony użytek utworów chronionych
dc.rights.licence
OTHER
dc.rights.uri*
http://ruj.uj.edu.pl/4dspace/License/copyright/licencja_copyright.pdf
dc.share.type
otwarte repozytorium
dc.subject.enpl
Erasmus
dc.subject.enpl
Luther
dc.subject.enpl
collective identity
dc.subject.enpl
geography
dc.subject.enpl
Batavism
dc.subject.enpl
erasmianism
dc.subject.enpl
German humanism and ntionalism
dc.subject.plpl
Erazm z Rotterdamu
dc.subject.plpl
Marcin Luter
dc.subject.plpl
tożsamość zbiorowa
dc.subject.plpl
geografia
dc.subject.plpl
Batawizm
dc.subject.plpl
erazmianizm
dc.subject.plpl
humanizm i nacjonalizm niemiecki
dc.subtypepl
Article
dc.titlepl
Czy Erazm z Rotterdamu był Niemcem? : o tożsamości zbiorowej humanistów północnych
dc.title.alternativepl
Was Erasmus a German? : on the collective Identity of northern humanists
dc.title.containerpl
Literatura renesansowa w Polsce i Europie : studia dedykowane Profesorowi Andrzejowi Borowskiemu
dc.typepl
BookSection
dspace.entity.type
Publication
Affiliations

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