Early Cretaceous record of microboring organisms in skeletons of growing corals

2012
journal article
article
13
dc.abstract.enA spectacularly preserved assemblage of microbial euendoliths, penetrating into skeletons of growing scleractinian corals, has been recognized in Early Aptian (Early Cretaceous) reef limestone of the Rara ̆ u Mountains (East Carpathians, NE Romania). Microboring euendolithic filaments were found in five coral colonies of the suborder Microsolenina. They remained in part well-preserved, often impregnated with iron oxides, which made them visible even in strongly recrystallized parts of coral skeletons. Filaments of a wide range of sizes (2–40 l m in diameter) were concentrated within medium parts of coral septa, oriented along the septa in the direction of the coral growth. The larger filaments were tubular, occurring in bundles and branched into finer, often tapering branches. Their behaviour and organization were quite similar to the modern euendolithic siphonalean chlorophyte Ostreobium . Filament diameters exceeded those reported for the modern species, but covered a similarly wide size range. Narrower frequently branching filaments, 4–8 l m in diameter, resemble distal branching patterns of modern Ostreobium quekettii. Some very thin filaments (ca. 1–2 l m) observed within skeleton or inside the large tubular filaments, sometimes associated with globular swellings, may represent euendolithic fungi. The recrystallization of coral skeleton had limited effect on preservation of euendoliths due to their impregnation with iron oxides; microbial euendoliths were subjected to different taphonomic changes.pl
dc.affiliationWydział Biologii i Nauk o Ziemi : Instytut Nauk Geologicznychpl
dc.contributor.authorKołodziej, Bogusław - 129014 pl
dc.contributor.authorGolubic, Stjepkopl
dc.contributor.authorBucur, Ioan I.pl
dc.contributor.authorRadtke, Gudrunpl
dc.contributor.authorTribollet, Alinepl
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-12T07:28:41Z
dc.date.available2016-05-12T07:28:41Z
dc.date.created2011pl
dc.date.issued2012pl
dc.description.number1pl
dc.description.physical34-45pl
dc.description.volume45pl
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1502-3931.2011.00291.xpl
dc.identifier.eissn1502-3931pl
dc.identifier.issn0024-1164pl
dc.identifier.urihttp://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/25584
dc.languageengpl
dc.language.containerengpl
dc.rightsDodaję tylko opis bibliograficzny*
dc.rights.uri*
dc.subject.enChlorophytespl
dc.subject.enEarly Cretaceouspl
dc.subject.enfungipl
dc.subject.enmicrobial euendolithspl
dc.subject.enRomaniapl
dc.subject.enscleractinian coralspl
dc.subtypeArticlepl
dc.titleEarly Cretaceous record of microboring organisms in skeletons of growing coralspl
dc.title.journalLethaiapl
dc.typeJournalArticlepl
dspace.entity.typePublication
dc.abstract.enpl
A spectacularly preserved assemblage of microbial euendoliths, penetrating into skeletons of growing scleractinian corals, has been recognized in Early Aptian (Early Cretaceous) reef limestone of the Rara ̆ u Mountains (East Carpathians, NE Romania). Microboring euendolithic filaments were found in five coral colonies of the suborder Microsolenina. They remained in part well-preserved, often impregnated with iron oxides, which made them visible even in strongly recrystallized parts of coral skeletons. Filaments of a wide range of sizes (2–40 l m in diameter) were concentrated within medium parts of coral septa, oriented along the septa in the direction of the coral growth. The larger filaments were tubular, occurring in bundles and branched into finer, often tapering branches. Their behaviour and organization were quite similar to the modern euendolithic siphonalean chlorophyte Ostreobium . Filament diameters exceeded those reported for the modern species, but covered a similarly wide size range. Narrower frequently branching filaments, 4–8 l m in diameter, resemble distal branching patterns of modern Ostreobium quekettii. Some very thin filaments (ca. 1–2 l m) observed within skeleton or inside the large tubular filaments, sometimes associated with globular swellings, may represent euendolithic fungi. The recrystallization of coral skeleton had limited effect on preservation of euendoliths due to their impregnation with iron oxides; microbial euendoliths were subjected to different taphonomic changes.
dc.affiliationpl
Wydział Biologii i Nauk o Ziemi : Instytut Nauk Geologicznych
dc.contributor.authorpl
Kołodziej, Bogusław - 129014
dc.contributor.authorpl
Golubic, Stjepko
dc.contributor.authorpl
Bucur, Ioan I.
dc.contributor.authorpl
Radtke, Gudrun
dc.contributor.authorpl
Tribollet, Aline
dc.date.accessioned
2016-05-12T07:28:41Z
dc.date.available
2016-05-12T07:28:41Z
dc.date.createdpl
2011
dc.date.issuedpl
2012
dc.description.numberpl
1
dc.description.physicalpl
34-45
dc.description.volumepl
45
dc.identifier.doipl
10.1111/j.1502-3931.2011.00291.x
dc.identifier.eissnpl
1502-3931
dc.identifier.issnpl
0024-1164
dc.identifier.uri
http://ruj.uj.edu.pl/xmlui/handle/item/25584
dc.languagepl
eng
dc.language.containerpl
eng
dc.rights*
Dodaję tylko opis bibliograficzny
dc.rights.uri*
dc.subject.enpl
Chlorophytes
dc.subject.enpl
Early Cretaceous
dc.subject.enpl
fungi
dc.subject.enpl
microbial euendoliths
dc.subject.enpl
Romania
dc.subject.enpl
scleractinian corals
dc.subtypepl
Article
dc.titlepl
Early Cretaceous record of microboring organisms in skeletons of growing corals
dc.title.journalpl
Lethaia
dc.typepl
JournalArticle
dspace.entity.type
Publication

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